Categories
Miscellaneous

Dear SMH – just fix your search engine why don’t you

Working for a customer experience consultancy, as I do, I am always on the look out for stories about customer activism or advocacy — so I was very interested in this story on the SMH about the influence of a customer in the removal of soft porn content from the Telstra BigPond service.  Except it wasn’t quite the story I had read in the Saturday paper, which I have quaintly photographed and included for you below.

Print version of the article that was published 28 April 2012

I wanted to archive the article in my bookmark library on Delicious, so I

  • searched the article title on SMH with no luck
  • searched the article title on Google with no luck
  • searched the author on SMH with some luck

Now the SMH search is unreliable verging on useless at the best of times but it is usually OK for articles a few days old. Also, I didn’t expect any problems cause I had a pretty accurate search query being the title itself.

It was on the 3rd search of the author name that I recognized a pretty similar article title with pretty similar content.  Surely this is something that other news junkies do? (Print title: “BigPond tips cold water on soft porn”; Online title: “Telstra pulls out of porn market after customer backlash”.)

So this blog post is a plea I guess, from a loyal reader of all formats, who still buys the paper: get your search engine to take all versions of a story into account, when a story appears differently online than it does in print. Think about the fact that readers still experience these different formats as the one entity. And just fix your search engine – unless you are trying to avoid your loyal readers finding the news on your site.

It’s just confusing otherwise, and really it just shouldn’t be such hard work.

Online version of the article that was published 27 April 2012
Categories
The Work Experience

It’s not that this particular article in interesting — its that articles like this are appearing more and more often: “Stop Working More Than 40 Hours a Week” via Inc.com

No new facts or research in this article. Just more evidence of a trend to discourage long working hours to promote productivity.

There’s been a flurry of recent coverage praising Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer of Facebook, for leaving the office every day at 5:30 p.m. to be with her kids. Apparently she’s been doing this for years, but only recently “came out of the closet,” as it were. What’s insane is that Sandberg felt the need to hide the fact, since there’s a century of research establishing the undeniable fact that working more than 40 hours per week actually decreases productivity.

… nobody should be apologizing for leaving at work at a reasonable hour like 5:30 p.m. In fact, people should be apologizing if they’re working too long each week–because it’s probably making the team less effective overall.

via inc.com
Categories
The Work Experience

Firms Push Visual Note Taking to Spark Creativity, Sharpen Focus – WSJ.com

Firms are holding training sessions to teach employees the basics of what’s known as visual note taking. Others, like vacation-rental company HomeAway Inc. and retailer Zappos, are hiring graphic recorders, consultants who sketch what is discussed at meetings and conferences, cartoon-style, to keep employees engaged.

Doodling proponents say it can help generate ideas, fuel collaboration and simplify communication. It can be especially helpful among global colleagues who don’t share a common first language. Putting pen to paper also is seen as an antidote to the pervasiveness of digital culture, getting workers to look up from their devices. And studies show it can help workers retain more information.

LinkedIn is pretty good at finding relevant content … which is how I came across this article from the Wall Street Journal on sketching. I have seen and posted a few images of Facebook HQ where there are blackboards and whiteboards everywhere. Seems like the trend is being encouraged elsewhere, helping concentration, collaboration and idea generation. Not only that, companies are employing graphic facilitators (also referred to as sketch artists, or graphic recorders) to annotate conferences and meetings so people don’t “zone out”. The UX/CX world employs this kind of technique when “envisioning” but I wonder if it will take off as a mainstream trend here in Australia for company meetings. Hope so.

Categories
The Work Experience

For the easily distracted

via Managing Distraction: How and Why to Ignore Your Inbox – Forbes

http://www.forbes.com/sites/dell/2012/04/19/managing-distraction-how-and-why-…

Categories
The Work Experience

Document collaboration

I was happy to be followed by @bilsel on Twitter, the creator of a new document collaboration tool, Clinked. It is designed to encourage collaboratio and comments and very importantly — sign off. I have worked in places that rely on seperate change logs for document edits. Its a punishing and clumsy workflow. This tool seems to solve that problem at least. One to experiment with in the near future.

 

 

Categories
The Work Experience

Does having it too good hamper innovation?

So thinks Nick Bilton in an opinion piece blaming comfort on the lack of mobile innovation at Facebook and Google

I have a theory on why they both have been slow to capitalise on the shift to mobile.
It’s that working at these companies is like going to work on an all-inclusive cruise ship. The analogy is apt in terms of the luxury — and the isolation.

via smh.com.au