Falling loyalty of employers to their staff is making more people switch jobs

Gienda Kwek of smh.com.au reports that workplace loyalty is diminishing due to less commitment on the part of employers to their employees with increased use of contractors and casuals. Dr Rafferty of the University of Sydney’s Workplace Research Centre notes that the risk of employment security once shared between workers and employers is now being shifted onto employees. Job security is now a top concern of employees and HR departments are responding in turn to keep talent.

Flexibility for work-life balance

[work life] imbalance is hurting companies’ bottom lines. As Slaughter points out, companies that have progressive work-life balance policies are more productive on the whole… “Examining 130 announcements of family-friendly policies in The Wall Street Journal, Arthur found that the announcements alone significantly improved share prices.

Getting training to stick: Google Revamps Its Workforce Education Programs via WSJ.com

Getting these programs to work, though, is tricky. Management experts say it is all well and good to send employees to classes, but to get the lessons to stick, employees need to apply them to their daily work lives. Employees often take a class and “say, ‘Gee, this is great,’ and go back to their jobs and do the same old thing,” says Professor David Bradford, director of the executive program in leadership at Stanford University.

Mr and Mrs Rude in the workplace

… There are benefits to rudeness … that is, for those who perpetrate it. In a study conducted by a trio of American universities last year, it was discovered that rude men earn 18 per cent more than “agreeable” men, while rude women earn 5 per cent more than nice women.

The study comprised 10,000 workers over a period of 20 years, and it concluded that one explanation for the salary difference is that rude people tend to be more forceful during salary negotiations. The result? They get what they want.